Last edited by Shasar
Thursday, April 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of Mr. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad. found in the catalog.

Mr. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad.

Investigator.

Mr. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad.

A reply to Mr. George Bliss.

by Investigator.

  • 219 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published in [New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893.,
  • Little Rock and Fort Smith Railway Company.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBy "Investigator."
    ContributionsBliss, George, 1830-1897.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHE2791 .L787
    The Physical Object
    Pagination16 p.
    Number of Pages16
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6025866M
    LC Control Number47044017
    OCLC/WorldCa19460084

    Get directions, reviews and information for Fort Smith Railroad Co in Fort Smith, AR. - Explore gingerk54's board "Fort Smith" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Fort smith, Fort smith arkansas and Arkansas pins.


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Mr. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad. by Investigator. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad: A reply to Mr. George Bliss [Investigator] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Investigator.

BLAINE'S LIES. Sept. 19, It was a letter of exculpation to be used in his explanation of the disgraceful Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad transactions. Buy Mr. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad: A reply to Mr.

George Bliss by Investigator (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Investigator. National committee, -- New York evening post -- Mr.

Blaine's railroad transactions -- Investigation, pseud. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad -- Mr. Blaine and his foreign policy / H.W. Hall -- Committee of one hundred, Boston -- Mr. Blaine's recordPages:   Inhe was commonly thought of as a presidential candidate, but again an allegation of bribery arose against him, this time that that year the Union Pacific Railroad had paid him $64, for Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad bonds he owned despite them being of little value.

Buy Mr. Blaine's replies to charges of improper transactions with bonds of the Union Pacific and the Little Rock and Fort Smith roads ([Pamphlets on U.S. history and politics) by James Gillespie Blaine (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low Author: James Gillespie Blaine. Full text of "Mr. Blaine and the "Mulligan" letters.

The whole story as told in the House of representatives, June 5, Reprinted verbatim from the "Congressional record." With an.

The one is alleged to have been the transfer of seventyfive first mortgage bonds of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad Company to the Union Pacific corporation at a price very much abovo. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Bliss, George, Charges against Mr.

Blaine examined, by A Republican. [New York, (OCoLC)   InMr. Blaine appeared to have the Republican nomination locked up until charges of a sweetheart deal with the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad surfaced.

It. OCLC Number: Notes: "The Mulligan letters complete."--Page [16], contain the correspondence between J.G. Blaine and Warren Fisher, Jr., from May to April The Little Rock (Pulaski County) to Fort Smith (Sebastian County) railroad span was organized in November as the Little Rock and Fort Smith Branch of the Cairo and Fulton Railroad Company.

Inwhile it was still a company only on paper, the Arkansas General Assembly passed a proposed act allowing the Little Rock and Fort Smith Branch to merge with the Memphis and Little Rock Railroad. G.W. & C.B.

Colton & Co, and Little Rock & Fort Smith R.R. Maps showing the connections of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad and its land grant. New York, New York, Map. Facts: 1 Mulligan letters Blaine entered the presidential campaign as the favorite, but his chances were almost immediately harmed by the emergence of a scandalFacts: 2 Rumors had begun to spread in February of that year that Blaine had been involved in a transaction with the Union Pacific Railroad in which the railroad had paid Blaine $ 64, for some Little Rock and Fort Smith.

Meanwhile, the Little Rock & Fort Smith Railroad began construction of a line to parallel the Little Rock and Fort Smith Amid concern over the generally slow pace of railroad construction, the General Assembly on Mapassed a measure demanding that all railroads that had received state aid and were presently.

were written by Republican presidential nominee James C. Blaine to a Boston businessman on behalf of the Little Rock and Fort Smith railroad. the suggestion of influence peddling was reinforced by Blaine's closing line "please burn these letters". when the news leaked out, Blaine who had retrieved them, refused to surrender them leaving the truth of the matter unsettled and his reputation.

Investigator. has written: 'Mr. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad'. Tabulated falsehoods. Look on this side and then on that. A correspondent asks us to print a complete list of the falsehoods which Mr.

Blaine has told at various times in connection with his Little Rock and Fort Smith railroad transactions, with. Page Order: Leaflet Available also through the Library of Congress web site in two forms: as facsimile page images and as full text in SGML.

Printed Ephemera Collection; PortfolioFolder 20g. Blaine denied the charges, as did the Union Pacific’s directors. Blaine claimed he never had any dealings with the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad except to purchase bonds at market price, and that he had lost money on the transaction.

Democrats in the House of Representatives nevertheless demanded a Congressional investigation. Eminent Persons, Vol. 6: Biographies Reprinted From the Times (Classic Reprint) on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Eminent Persons, Vol.

6:. Home Railroads - Photographs, Manuscripts, and Imprints [''Arkansas'' locomotive, Little Rock & Fort Smith Railroad, McKay & Aldus Iron Works].

It was said that Mr. Blaine had pledged a number of worthless railroad bonds to the Union Pacific Railway Company in return for a loan of $64, which had never been repaid. It was also charged that without consideration he had received bonds of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad.

By September of Blaine had sold over $, in Little Rock railroad bonds (worth about $2 million today), mostly to other railroad barons.

And he had been paid very handsome commissions for. BROKER BLAINE. How a Speaker Was Paid for His Ruling and Influence. How James 6. Blaine Put Moneyfia Hi* Purse—iosiah Caldwell’s Explanation ]of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad Bonds Transaction.

Sonoma Democrat, Volume XXVII, Num 6 September — BROKER BLAINE. How a Speaker Was Paid for His Ruling and Influence. MULLIGAN LETTERS.

MULLIGAN LETTERS. Between andJames G. Blaine wrote a series of letters to a Boston businessman, Warren Fisher Jr., that indicated Blaine had used his official power as Speaker of the House of Representatives to promote the fortunes of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad.

James Mulligan, an employee of Fisher's, testified before a congressional committee that. Blaine is the gym leader in Cinnabar Island. When you get to Cinnabar Island the door to the gym is locked, you need to go to the Pokemon Mansion to retrieve the key. Once you have it you get to. a series of letters written by James G.

Blaine to a Boston businessman, Warren Fisher Jr., that indicated Blaine had used his official power as Speaker of the House of Representatives to promote the fortunes of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad.

About fifteen years before the election, Blaine served as speaker of the house, and was involved in passing a land grant for the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad, however as a result he received a great deal of money in bonds from the company.

MULLIGAN LETTERS.A series of letters written by James G. Blaine (q.v.) to Warren Fisher, a business associate, which, it was alleged, proved corrupt connection, on the part of Blaine, with legislation in Congress favoring the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad and the Northern Pacific Railroad.

The letters were obtained from Fisher by one James Mulligan, a former clerk of Fisher, who. to8 railroads built in Ft. Smith 1. Little Rock and Fort Smith - now UP 2. Louis San Francisco - now A&M (Ft.

Smith to Monett, MO) 3. Arkansas Central - now Ft. Smith Railroad (abandoned E of Ft. Smith) 4. Kansas City Pittsburg and Gulf - now KCS 5. Fort Smith and Western - abandoned 6. Fort Smith Suburban - abandoned Size: 84KB.

One such attempt was the famous Mulligan Letters. A man from Boston, James Mulligan, claimed to have an assortment of letters from Blaine to Warren Fisher Jr. Mulligan had been the bookkeeper for Fisher who was the builder of Little Rock and Fort Smith, Arkansas.

The Gilded Age’s dirty politics. Albert B. Southwick baby and James G. Blaine’s habit of bribery. a phony letter from the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad — which he had showered Author: Albert B. Southwick. the Little Rock and Fort Smith R. Co., aud pay Morton, Bliss & Co.

$60, for them ; witness thought at the time the bonds were worth eighty cents on the dollar. He made the loan for Scott, depositing as col­ lateral 67 income bonds of the Union Pacific and 75 of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad Company. Between andJames G. Blaine wrote a series of letters to a Boston businessman, Warren Fisher Jr., that indicated Blaine had used his official power as Speaker of the House of Representatives to promote the fortunes of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad.

Roots’ brother was chief engineer of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad. James Gillespie Blaine () was the nearest thing to a political idol in a politically uninspiring era, serving in Congress from to As secretary of state, he laid the basis for American imperialism. Of Scotch-Irish descent, James G.

Blaine was born in West Brownsville, Pa., on Jan. 31, His father was a locally prominent. Most notorious was his involvement with the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad. He had made a ruling which enriched this line, and for his efforts he had been given considerable holdings in it. Something of this leaked out in the spring offrom letters written by Blaine to a railroad executive named Warren Fisher and preserved by James.

National committee, -- New York evening post -- Mr. Blaine's railroad transactions -- Investigation, pseud. Blaine and the Little Rock & Fort Smith railroad -- Mr.

Blaine and his foreign policy / H.W. Hall -- Committee of one hundred, Boston -- Mr. Blaine's atic party. National committee, Eminent Persons, Vol: Unknown Author: Books - Skip to main content.

Try Prime EN Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Cart. Books Go Search Best Sellers Gift Ideas New Releases Deals Author: Unknown Author. Rockefeller 2 volumes New York are outstand ing among biographies of from SOCY at Boston College. On 2 May a resolution was adopted in the house to investigate an alleged purchase by the Union Pacific railroad company, at an excessive price, of certain bonds of the Little Rock and Fort Smith railroad.

It soon became evident that the investigation was aimed at Mr. Blaine.The Little Rock & Fort Smith Railroad Company received a land grant from the United States, and on the 28th of April,its application to the state for 'the benefits of' the act of Jwas granted as a 'loan of state credit.'.InBlaine used his influence as speaker of the house to ensure passage of a land grant for the Little Rock & Fort Smith Railroad.

In gratitude, Warren Fisher, one of the firm's contractors, allowed Blaine to sell securities in the railroad company and, at the speaker's insistence, pocket a suspiciously large commission in bonds.